Backyard Botanicals - The Series Continues

 First stages of carving.

First stages of carving.

 This print was fairly difficult to carve, register, and print due to the details of the flowers and buds.

This print was fairly difficult to carve, register, and print due to the details of the flowers and buds.

 The next print in the series was based on the Spiderwort plant. I am always excited about the carving of an image and sometimes want to stop and just keep the plate!

The next print in the series was based on the Spiderwort plant. I am always excited about the carving of an image and sometimes want to stop and just keep the plate!

 I am beginning to carve a Lenten Rose, one of my favorite flowers. I wanted the flower to have a light colored palette and the background to have darker hues.

I am beginning to carve a Lenten Rose, one of my favorite flowers. I wanted the flower to have a light colored palette and the background to have darker hues.

 This is the photograph upon which the print is based.

This is the photograph upon which the print is based.

 This is the print after the final and ninth run on the press. The ink was a dark marroon. I am so excited with this palette and the finished print!

This is the print after the final and ninth run on the press. The ink was a dark marroon. I am so excited with this palette and the finished print!

I have now completed several botanical prints. It has been a journey exploring carving techniques, printing on an antique letterpress, as well as mixing and combining colors. There have been numerous challenges. Here are some images of prints, drawings, and other aspects of the work process.

 Here is the completed print after seven runs on the press. This means there are seven colors, the lighest one being the pale blue background. Note the plate and tracing paper - remnants of the process. I call this print  Blue Daffodil.

Here is the completed print after seven runs on the press. This means there are seven colors, the lighest one being the pale blue background. Note the plate and tracing paper - remnants of the process. I call this print Blue Daffodil.

 Here is the finished print. I call this one  Winter Edgeworthia . I was particularly pleased with the registration of the layers and color palette.

Here is the finished print. I call this one Winter Edgeworthia. I was particularly pleased with the registration of the layers and color palette.

 I am printing; purples and blues were the dominant colors in this print.

I am printing; purples and blues were the dominant colors in this print.

 I used a rainbow roll in the first layer of this print. I also left some of the leaves uncarved. I was pleased with these and how they gave the image more depth in the background.

I used a rainbow roll in the first layer of this print. I also left some of the leaves uncarved. I was pleased with these and how they gave the image more depth in the background.

 Printing the flower - oh so love how the layers and details are coming together.

Printing the flower - oh so love how the layers and details are coming together.

 Most of the flower is carved away. Notice I left some in the center in order to give the flower portion of the print more depth as it will be the final and darkest color. I am also moving forward with the background and it is getting darker in color.

Most of the flower is carved away. Notice I left some in the center in order to give the flower portion of the print more depth as it will be the final and darkest color. I am also moving forward with the background and it is getting darker in color.

I continue to learn as I develop this series. Reduction prints are challenging, but a great way to explore technique, image, and color!